Crepidodera fulvicornis (Fabricius, 1792)

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This very widespread species is generally common throughout the Palaearctic region from Spain to China and Japan and is Morocco and most of the Mediterranean islands, in Europe it occurs from lowlands to about 1600 m and has been recorded up to 2000 m in Turkey, it extends north to the UK and far above the Arctic Circle in Fennoscandia and was formerly supposed to be represented in North America by ssp. nana (say, 1824) but this  now seems to be a distinct species. In the UK it is generally common throughout England and Wales, including all the islands, and much more local and sporadic to the north of Scotland and across Northern Ireland. Host plants include a range of willows e.g. White Willow (Salix alba L.), Eared Willow (S. aurita L.), Goat Willow (S. caprea L.), Grey Willow (S. cinerea L. and its subspecies) and Creeping Willow (S. repens L.) and also, though less often, Black Poplar (Populus nigra L.) and Aspen (P. tremula L.), but beyond these the adults often occur on other broadleaf trees such as birches (Betula L.) and Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Adults occur year-round, they overwinter under bark or in tussocks or litter and are active from April until October, peaking in abundance during May and June, and are likely to occur on host trees wherever they are growing, often in wetland situations but also in parks, wasteland, verges, coastal dunes and even domestic gardens and other ruderal sites. Following emergence in the spring the adults feed on host foliage causing small holes in the leaves and they also commonly occur on blossom, possibly feeding on nectar and pollen, before mating begins in May. Females oviposit in soil below host trees and larvae emerge from the end of May, they feed on host roots and are fully developed within about four weeks. Pupation occurs from July in a subterranean cell and new-generation adults appear from the end of July until late in the summer, the earliest adults will feed but will not reproduce until the following spring and so there is a single generation each year. Adults will soon appear in numbers when sweeping suitable foliage or beating hawthorn blossom etc, to generic level they are easily recognized but there are a few similar species and so careful examination will be needed.

Crepidodera fulvicornis 1

Crepidodera fulvicornis 1

Crepidodera fulvicornis 2

Crepidodera fulvicornis 2

Crepidodera fulvicornis 3

Crepidodera fulvicornis 3

2.3-3.0mm. Elongate-oval and discontinuous in outline, unicoloured bright metallic green, golden-green, pale bronze or deep blue, often with the elytral margins darker, legs pale brown with the hind femora partly darkened, antennae pale but gradually darkened towards the apex. Head transverse with large convex eyes and distinct frontal tubercles defined by narrow grooves, vertex smooth and shiny. Pronotum transverse (up to 1.5X wider than long), broadest in front of the middle and sinuate before acute posterior angles, surface strongly but not densely punctured and with short linear basal fovea which are not united by a transverse impression. Elytra almost parallel-sided from sloping shoulders to a continuous apical margin, striae, including a long scutellary striole, strongly punctured and well-defined to the apex, interstices smooth and more or less flat. Hind femora greatly enlarged, front and middle femora normal, all tibiae with a tiny apical spur. Tarsi pseudotetramerous.